The Vitruvian Square | The Rule of Thirds (Part 1)

You can observe a lot just by looking around. – Yogi Berra

Have your readings stopped flowing as easily as they used to? Have you started to feel trapped in your interpretations or reading style? Are you bored with your oracle technique?  Just want something new? Have I got something really worthwhile for you today!

Those of you who are familiar with photography may have heard of The Rule of Thirds; a kind of work-of-art, compositional and general rule of thumb. Simply, it involves the concept that you conjure up an image that is broken down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have nine equal parts that are made distinct by the use of two equally-spaced horizontal lines and two equally-spaced vertical lines. Further, as John Thomas Smith said in his Remarks on Rural Scenery . . . And to give the utmost force and solidity to your work, some part of the picture should be as light, and some as dark as possible : These two extremes are then to be harmonized and reconciled to each other.

Sound familiar? It is no accident that The Vitruvian Square has the same dominant structure and visual impact. Today, let’s begin to explore why The Rule of Thirds used with The Vitruvian Square will yield you such solid and compelling results. Remember, this is just an introduction to this approach to The Vitruvian Square.

So, let’s get started . . .

With The Vitruvian Square, you have a power grid of sorts. Each of the four intersections (the four corners of the Number 5 square) that are created by the Lines of Consequence are situations of importance in a reading. Each of the four Lines of Consequence (remember, you have two vertical and two horizontal lines), in turn, serve as incredible and valuable distinctions, and ways to keep apart the various mental, emotional, and material worlds, as well as the several timings built into The Vitruvian Square (e.g, Past, Present, and Future).

Thus,  when you look at The Vitruvian Square, below, you can clearly see that, in unity with The Rule of Thirds, the Vitruvian matrix is solidly comprised of nine squares (the Places of Power). There are also the four, primary intersecting Lines of Consequence I spoke about; two vertical lines and two horizontal lines.

The first power point is made up of the intersection of the following Places of Power: Square 1 (Beginning), Square 2 (Connecting), Square 4 (Building), and Square 5 (Changing). When this power point is involved in a reading (in other words, one of more of your cards or oracle tools is touching this point), there is an underlying indication – almost a subconscious guide – that new associations and interdependence are increasing, with a resulting change in a current situation. This is the power point  of reshaping bonds by adding new friends and moving towards more structure to your life. As with all the power points, the more cards that are touching this location, the stronger that particular indication. Naturally, each indicator should be read in the context of its specific Place of Power.

The second power point is made up of the intersection of the following Places of Power: Square 2 (Connecting), Square 3 (Creating), Square 5 (Changing), and Square 6 (Uniting). When this power point is involved in a reading, there is an indication that new achievements and intellectual pursuits are coming, with a resulting change in a current situation. This is the power point of choosing to create change through binding and linking yourself with others and a move towards a desired outcome in the world around you. The more cards that direct you to this spot, the more you are joining forces – internally and externally – with others.

The third power point is made up of the intersection of the following Places of Power: Square 4 (Building), Square 5 (Changing), Square 7 (Defeating), and Square 8 (Moving). When this power point is involved in a reading, there is an indication that the person being read has an emotional need and want to move away from the current situation. These choices, by the way, result from a desire to conquer a fear or vanquish a current, unwanted situation.

The fourth and final power point is made up of the intersection of the following Places of Power: Square 5 (Changing), Square 6 (Uniting), Square 8 (Moving), and Square 9 (Completing). When this power point is involved in a reading, there is an indication that the person being read is, like the last power point, moving away from a current situation. This time, however, the choice for change is provoked by the transforming of relationships in one’s life at the moment. This is power point of either reacting to the ebb and flow of other people’s energies.

In using The Vitruvian Square, then, more excitement, vitality, and fascination can be created in a reading by including an interpretation of the patterns and intersections that are seen. As I have explained, in the past, you look for and interpret the dynamic tension involved in your reading (in addition to the other elements you are used to reading).

By the way, if you haven’t noticed, yet, applying the Rule of Thirds to The Vitruvian Square is less about where the cards or other oracle device actually land or are placed (although those are important), and more about where you aim your attention.

Naturally, I have just scratched the surface of what can be accomplished by starting to look at The Vitruvian Square in a Rule of Thirds context. For example, you can actually give a four-card reading by placing four cards (or other oracle device) on the four Situations of Importance. But . . . that’s for a later discussion!

To be continued . . .

Just some thoughts. If you enjoyed this, please click below to share this with others.

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© 2011 by Scott Grossberg. All Rights Reserved. thinkingmagically.com
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7 thoughts on “The Vitruvian Square | The Rule of Thirds (Part 1)

  1. Saw this on Tarot Dame’s (kiki’s) website, so I just HAD to check it out. Normally I don’t get into this type of thing, but the way she explains it and uses it makes a lot of sense to me. I’ll definitely be looking into it further. Thank you!

  2. Pingback: The Vitruvian Square | The Rule of Thirds (Part 2) « Scott Grossberg | Thinking Magically™

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